(281) 351-8851 15635 FM 2920, Tomball, Texas 77377
Sunday - Wednesday 9-5 Thursday - Saturday 9-6

The Arbor Gate Blog

Latests Posts

Fig Preserves Recipe
Posted on : July 18, 2013

The figs are coming in great this year! Because I’ve already had multiple requests for this, I figured “Why not share it with everyone?”

Let us know what you think of the recipe!

Fig Preserves

  • • 16 cups figs
  • • White distilled vinegar
  • • 1T baking soda
  • • 12 cups boiling water
  • • 8 cups white cane sugar
  • • 4 cups water
  • • 2 lemons, sliced thinly and seeded

Wash and sterilize eight pint jars. You can use wide mouth or regular. This recipe will make 6 – 7 jars depending on how far down you boil the syrup. I like to have extras just in case.

Sort figs, discarding damaged figs and removing stems. Place in a clean sink and cover with cold water. Add ½ cup white distilled vinegar and soak for 5 – 10 minutes. Rinse well, drain and place in a large pot (6 – 8 quart).

Sprinkle the baking soda over the figs; cover with the 12 cups of boiling water. Soak for 45 minutes to 1 hour. This helps remove any latex from the skin of any slightly under-ripe figs. Gently turn the figs into a colander, draining all the water. Rinse the figs at least twice with cold water and drain.

Combine the sugar, 4 cups water and lemon slices in the large pot. Bring to a boil and boil for 10 minutes. Add the figs, reduce heat to a gentle boil, and continue boil for 60 to 90 minutes. Stir occasionally by bringing the bottom figs up to the top gently with a wooden spoon. Don’t stir hard enough to break the figs.

The figs will be deep amber and glossy, almost translucent. How long you boil them largely depends on preference. One hour will produce a rich syrup about the consistency of maple syrup. One and one half hours will produce a thicker syrup, more like honey, and the figs will be almost candied. If you want to take them to candied, you must stand over the pot for the last reduction or they may burn.

Spoon the figs into sterilized jars and top with the syrup to within ½” of the rim. Do not over-fill. Seal with bands and lids. Process in a hot water bath for 10 minutes.

If you have syrup left over, you can also preserve it. Just fill a jar and process it along with the figs. Fig syrup is a wonderful substitute for pancake syrup, over biscuits, or drizzled over cream cheese or yogurt. It also makes a wonderful, mild sweetener when drizzled over fresh fruits.

You can add one more lemon if you wish. Lemon brightens the flavor of the figs and offsets the sweetness. Using lemon adds sufficient acid so you don’t have to add ascorbic acid.

Written by Angela Chandler

Angela Chandler is a lifelong gardener with a passion for learning and teaching. She tends a ½ acre garden in Highlands, Texas that includes ornamentals, fruits, a small experimental nursery, a flock of Buff Orpington chickens, and a Lab mix named Harley. Her gardening adventures would not be possible without her husband, Fred – always willing to help unload leaves, compost and help build beds. Angela is a member of the Harris County Master Gardener Association – Retired, and a member of the Garden Writer’s Association.

Garden

Comments

Israel |

I'm going to be back in NM Sept 27-Oct 9. Are you having any clsaess? I would be willing to pay for a private lesson. I have a canon rebel and also a basic Kodak point and shoot.Would like to learn before the balloonsJoanie

Reply